European F-gas Facts

The working fluid in the THEAC-25 is Argon, which is an inert gas with a zero global warming potential (GWP=0).

Most other cooling systems rely on F-gases

  • The three groups of F-gases are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). HFCs are by far the most relevant F-gases from a climate perspective
  • F-gases account for 2% of the EU’s overall greenhouse gas emissions, but F-gas emissions have risen by 60% since 1990 – in contrast to all other greenhouse gases, which have been reduced
  • Some F-gases, especially HFCs, are relatively short-lived; others, in particular  PFCs and SF6, can remain in the atmosphere for thousands of years
  • A first F-gas Regulation was adopted in 2006 and succeeded in stabilising EU F-gas emissions at 2010 levels. A new Regulation, which replaces the first and applies from 1 January 2015, strengthens the existing measures and introduces a number of far-reaching changes. By 2030 it will cut the EU’s F-gas emissions by two-thirds compared with 2014 levels. By 2030 it will cut the EU’s F-gas emissions by two-thirds compared with 2014 levels.
  • The expected cumulative emission savings are 1.5 Gigatonnes of CO2-equivalent by 2030 and 5 Gigatonnes by 2050. The latter number is more than the CO2 produced by a billion return flights from Paris to New York and more than the sum of all greenhouse gas emitted in the EU during one year.